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Ode to Gene Mallove
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Does an alternate form of energy threaten current energy companies?
Yes
60%
 60%  [ 3 ]
No
40%
 40%  [ 2 ]
Maybe
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 5

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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 5:58 am    Post subject: Ode to Gene Mallove Reply with quote
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On May 14, 2004, Bow engineer and science writer Eugene Mallove was beaten to death in Norwich, Conn., allegedly by two middle-aged crack addicts. He had gone to Norwich to clean up his childhood home and died on the front lawn where he played as a kid.

Mallove was the world's biggest cheerleader for cold fusion, the room-temperature nuclear reaction that its discoverers claim can produce massive amounts of heat without generating radioactivity. He battled public scorn to campaign for money to research a scientific discovery he believed would free the earth from the deadly grip of fossil fuels.

Mallove believed cold fusion could provide an endless supply of clean, cheap energy. To promote the technology and allow researchers to share information, he founded Infinite Energymagazine.

The publication survived his demise, and we received our new copy recently. As we always do when it arrives, we looked for the ad offering readers the chance to purchase the shoebox-sized cold fusion reactor that Mallove predicted would be powering most homes by now. As always, it wasn't there.

Seventeen years after science was rocked by the chemists Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann's announcement that they had created a safe nuclear reaction in a tabletop experiment, cold fusion remains stuck in limbo between accepted fact and futurist fantasy.

In recent years, the needle has moved slightly in the direction of acceptance that cold fusion, the alleged combination of two nuclei of hydrogen to form one helium atom and a lot of heat, is a real, if poorly understood, reaction.

Pons and Fleishmann were at first celebrated on the cover of Time magazine and then mocked as clumsy scientists fooled by their inaccurate data. But today, a half-dozen types of energy-producing reactions come under the rubric of cold fusion.

Last March, scientists at the annual conference of the august American Physical Society heard presentations on cold fusion. Next month, the Second International Conference on Future Energy will be held in Washington, D.C. The vast majority of physicists remains skeptical, but at the Office of Naval Research, six of the nine experiments performed produced an unexplainable amount of excess heat.

D2 Fusion, an investor-backed California cold fusion research company, is said to be planning the debut of a one-kilowatt cold fusion generator. And investors have bet $50 million on Blacklight Power, a New Jersey company working on a pollution-free device that will generate heat and electricity using ocean water as fuel.

One physicist working in the field believes cold-fusion home-heating units are no more than a decade away. Others are even more optimistic. Everyone who doesn't have stock in or work for a fossil-fuel-related company hopes they are right.

Then again, Mallove said the same thing a decade ago.

Global warming poses an immense threat. It's possible there may be a point beyond which its reversal will be impossible. Cold fusion, believers say, could be the answer.

The scientists struggling to make progress, including those helped by a foundation Mallove created in 2003, are right about one thing: Progress might come far more rapidly with government funding.

Unfortunately, the technology remains too new, mysterious and unproven. Without a reliable working model, cold fusion warrants only a slight infusion of taxpayer money, if any at all.
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 5:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Open letter from Gene Mallove:
http://www.pureenergysystems.c.....index.html
And another cool link:
http://www.greatdreams.com/mallove.htm
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Lester
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I think they should adapt or die.
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thelast007
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
exactly.
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
The War On ***Cold Fusion***One kick-ass little video 46 Minute:
http://video.google.com/videop.....&hl=en
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 3:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
exton wrote:
I looked at the scientific paper for the study at utah that he was all excited about. It doesn't look like a solution to energy problems at all.

At most, it raised interesting questions.


It is unproven. But not impossible. I believe he was very close. And if successful, it could completly get us off of fossil fuels. It would be much safer than a hot fusion.

The problem is that the conventional thinking is that
nuclear fusion at room temperature, of the type discussed in one of the reports, would be contrary to all understanding gained of nuclear reactions in the last half century; it would require the invention of an entirely new nuclear process. Yet, scientists continue to work on it to this day.

Does that mean that they should just give up? The Navy doesn't think so:

http://www.infinite-energy.com...../navy.html

P.S. I dragged this conversation over to this forum from another... Smile
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exton
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 3:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'm not sure we're on the same page here.

What EXACTLY do you think this cold fusion of his involves?
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 4:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
exton wrote:
I'm not sure we're on the same page here.

What EXACTLY do you think this cold fusion of his involves?


It is the name for effects which could be nuclear fusion reactions occuring near room temperature and pressure using relatively simple and low-input energy devices. In hot nuclear fusion, two nuclei are forced to join together to form a heavier nucleus. During that process, energy is released.

Cold fusion is the popular term used to refer to what is properly called "low energy nuclear reactions" (LENR), part of the field of "condensed matter nuclear science" (CMNS)

It's energy output was found not to be great enough. Also all cold fusion experiments have produced power in bursts lasting for days or weeks, not for months as would be needed for many commercial applications.

Close enough?
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exton
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 4:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
uhm.

No, i know what cold fusion is.

I was askign what you thought THIS particular incarnation of it involves.

For example, you can get energy by burning fossil fuels. But the *way* that you get that energy and use it differs greatly for the different sorts of engines that run on it.
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
exton wrote:
uhm.

No, i know what cold fusion is.

I was askign what you thought THIS particular incarnation of it involves.

For example, you can get energy by burning fossil fuels. But the *way* that you get that energy and use it differs greatly for the different sorts of engines that run on it.


Right, but this is with fissionable materials and not coal or some other fossil fuel. It's overall yield would be much greater
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 4:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
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Warming Up to Cold Fusion

Peter Hagelstein is trying to revive hope for a future of clean, inexhaustible, inexpensive energy. Fifteen years after the scientific embarrassment of the century, is this the beginning of something?

By Sharon Weinberger
Sunday, November 21, 2004; Page W22

    On a quiet Monday in late August -- a time of year when much of the Washington bureaucracy has gone to the beach -- a panel of scientists gathered at a Doubletree Hotel set between the Congressional Plaza strip mall and a drab concrete office building on Rockville Pike. They sat around a U-shaped table decked with laptops, with three government officials at the front, ready to hear about an idea that, if it worked, could change the world.
    The panel's charge was simple: to determine whether that idea had even a prayer of a chance at working.
    The Department of Energy went to great lengths to cloak the meeting from public view. No announcement, no reporters. None of the names of the people attending that day was disclosed. The DOE made sure to inform the panel's members that they were to provide their conclusions individually rather than as a group, which under a loophole in federal law allowed the agency to close the meeting to the public.
    At 9:30 a.m., six presenters were invited in and instructed to sit in a row of chairs along the wall. The group included a prominent MIT physicist, a Navy researcher and four other scientists from Russia, Italy and the United States. They had waited a long time for this opportunity and, one by one, stood up to speak about a scientific idea they had been pursuing for more than a decade.
    All the secrecy likely had little to do with national security and more to do with avoiding possible embarrassment to the agency. To some, the meeting would seem no less outrageous than if the DOE honchos had convened for a seance to raise the dead -- and in a way, they had: Fifteen years ago, the DOE held a very similar review of the very same idea.
    It was front-page news back in 1989. The subject was cold fusion, the claim that nuclear energy could be released at room temperature, using little more than a high school chemistry set. In one of the most infamous episodes of modern science, two chemists at the University of Utah announced at a news conference that they had harnessed the power of the sun in a test tube. It was, if true, the holy grail of energy: pollution-free, cheap and virtually unlimited.
    If it worked, cold fusion could supply the country's energy needs, with no more smog, no more nuclear waste, no more depending on other countries for oil. For a brief moment, an energy revolution seemed on the horizon.
    But when many laboratories tried and failed to reproduce the Utah results, scientists began to line up against cold fusion. Less than a year after the announcement, a DOE review found that none of the experiments had demonstrated convincing evidence of cold fusion. Almost as quickly as they had become famous, the scientists involved became the butt of comedians' jokes. A Time magazine millennium poll ranked cold fusion among the "worst ideas" of the century.
    But now, at the Doubletree in Rockville, it seemed all that could change. For the scientists who had risked ostracism to persist in studying cold fusion, the very fact that the Energy Department was reviewing their work this summer seemed like a breakthrough. True, according to two of the presenters who were there, the meeting began with harsh questions. But at 5 p.m., the presenters were ordered to leave the room, and when they returned, the mood had visibly lifted. At the end, the scientists presenting the idea and those reviewing it all shook hands. The reviewers stayed on to discuss the material. The cold fusionists went to a barbecue, feeling celebratory. No one had told them if the presentation had convinced anyone that cold fusion was real. But it was nice, they said, after so many years, just to be treated with respect.
    [SRI International chemist Michael] McKubre claims that when an experiment works, scientists can measure fleeting bursts of excess heat released in the process -- at times, up to 30 percent more energy comes out than went in. In some experiments, McKubre has detected byproducts, such as helium and tritium, that often accompany nuclear reactions. He says both phenomena are clear proof that fusion has occurred.
    Since 1989, hundreds of scientists working in dozens of labs around the world have claimed similar results. Supporters point to the written literature -- more than 3,000 papers -- as proof of the effect. But the most credible cold fusion advocates concede that the vast majority of those papers are of poor quality; one supporter called the collection "mixed toxic waste."
    Research money has dried up. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has refused to grant a patent on any invention claiming cold fusion. According to Esther Kepplinger, the deputy commissioner of patents, this is for the same reason it wouldn't give one for a perpetual motion machine: It doesn't work.
    These problems are all tied to the 1989 DOE review. While the report's language was measured, pointing out the lack of experimental evidence, "it was absolutely the intention of most of the framers of that document to kill cold fusion," McKubre says. "Cold fusion," he writes in an e-mail, "has the potential to replace all sources of energy and power, indefinitely."
    "Brilliant," "genius" and "reclusive" were words used to describe [SRI scientist Peter] Hagelstein 20 years ago, when he rose to prominence as one of the young scientists behind President Ronald Reagan's plans to build a missile shield in outer space. He made his mark designing the X-ray laser that was to be the centerpiece of Reagan's "Star Wars" anti-ballistic missile system.
    Hagelstein describes the mainstream scientific community as "mafias" that promote and publish their friends' work, unwilling to accept new ideas. As Hagelstein explains it, leading physicists came out swiftly and prematurely against cold fusion.
    Hagelstein says his acceptance of cold fusion was by no means immediate. "Sometimes I was pretty sure that it was real, and sometimes I was convinced that it was all junk," he writes in an e-mail. It took several years before he was convinced. "At this point, there are far too many results, of many different types, that constitute an argument that is very strong. There is no going back."
    As cold fusion research limped forward, Hagelstein faced a series of personal reverses. He has tenure at MIT, but he never made full professor. When his funding ran out, he eventually lost his lab space, his secretary, even his office. He has suffered from depression, which he attributes to his experience with cold fusion, but also downplays it. "What's more important," he asks, "me taking a little grief or if, by my actions, I could make a difference in the world?"
    Hagelstein today remains the best-known name in the cold fusion community. And that's why in April 2003, he wrote directly to Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham to request a new review. By November, the DOE had decided to do it, agreeing that after 15 years it was reasonable to review the progress of work in the field. The August review was limited to a single question, according to McKubre: Is the work surrounding cold fusion legitimate science? A positive answer -- even short of a ringing endorsement -- would finally lift the stigma, McKubre has said. It would also "loosen the purse strings" among potential funders. As of last month, the Department of Energy was saying that the review would be released by the end of the year.
    McKubre often speaks about a company in Israel, Energetics Technologies, that has received a couple of million dollars a year in private support to research cold fusion and has achieved "startling results," producing much higher levels of power and heat than his own experiments. McKubre has visited the lab. "It's the first clear indication that something practical might come out of all this effort," he says.
    Hagelstein says, he has seen enough cold fusion data to convince him that the science is clearly real. The field's acceptance, he maintains, will be simply a matter of the scientific community's looking at the improved experimental results in the future and coming to understand them.

Link to same article/source:
http://www.wanttoknow.info/coldfusion


Last edited by Xerxes on Wed May 02, 2007 5:04 am; edited 1 time in total
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exton
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 4:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Xerxes wrote:

Right, but this is with fissionable materials and not coal or some other fossil fuel. It's overall yield would be much greater


*smacks forehead*

I'm guessing that you have no idea what the device he talks about does.

It does not use fissionable materials - it uses deuterium (a hydrogen isotope) and results in neutrons and tritium (yet another hydrogen isotope).

And the alleged fusion is...kind of wierd. It's not really fusion in the typical sense; normally, when two atoms fuse, they form new elements.

In this case, that (supposedly) doesn't happen. Instead, deuterium (hydrogen atoms with one proton, and two neutrons) somehow yields neutrons and tritium (hydrogen atoms with one proton, and three neutrons).

If the data is accurate, then a nuclear process of some kind has to be going on; otherwise, you wouldn't get any neutrons or tritium coming out of it. No one knows what is going on or why, or even if it actually happens as reported.
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
So, it is not bombarded with neutrons to cause a reaction?

Last edited by Xerxes on Wed May 02, 2007 5:23 am; edited 1 time in total
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exton
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 5:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Xerxes wrote:
Which experiment are you referring to?


The one gene mallove got all excited about.

http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/F.....troche.pdf

^That's the paper that was published by the scientists at utah who did the experiment.

Quote:

So, it is not bombarded with anything to cause a reaction?


As far as i can tell, that's correct. No bombarding.

Eh. Were you under the impression that that's what cold fusion is?

No one denies that you can fuse atoms through atom-smashing. It's just that that's just not something you can use for actually generating energy; trying to power something with that would be like trying to generate energy for a heat engine by heating things up through shooting them with a gun; even if you could generate more energy than it takes to make the gun and bullets, it's still not a good way of doing things.
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Xerxes
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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I was not quite sure if the atom was struck by a moving neutron like with fission or if it was more like a fusion where the energy can also be produced by combining light nuclei. and their mutual repulsion must be overcome due to the fact that the positively charged protons. Or, if it was somewhere in between. It said in one of those articles that it bonded to the whole frame of the molecule in coldfusion
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